Coverart for item
The Resource Doors open, Ian Rankin

Doors open, Ian Rankin

Label
Doors open
Title
Doors open
Statement of responsibility
Ian Rankin
Creator
Author
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
Three friends descend upon an art auction and concoct a plan to "liberate" several paintings from the National Gallery. As enterprising girlfriends, clever detectives, a crime boss, seductive auctioneers and a Hell's Angel named Hate enter the picture, this fast-paced story of second guesses and double crosses keeps changing the picture
Storyline
Pace
Tone
Writing style
Character
Review
  • Mike Mackenzie is “thirty-seven years old, rich and bored.” Having sold his software company, he hasn’t found a replacement for the thrill of high-stakes entrepreneurship; only collecting art satisfies his soul. Then barroom banter with friends—Why should great paintings languish in warehouses when they could belong to people who properly appreciate them?—suggests another pastime. Talk turns serious, and soon the unlikely thieves are ready to execute their plan, swapping originals for fakes on “Doors Open Day,” when nonpublic institutions offer tours. Mackenzie feels alive again, but as the number of conspirators grows to include professional criminals, the rank amateurs’ perfect crime begins to unravel. Fans of Rankin’s excellent, just-ended John Rebus series will likely be disappointed by this offering. While Rankin builds some suspense with a dogged DI named Ransome and a Hell’s Angel named Hate—the tension remains perfectly bearable. Mackenzie seems unfazed by the threat of jail time, characters are glib when they ought to be scared, and the tepid ending takes a page, if you will, right out of Scooby-Doo: in danger, Mackenzie buys time by explaining the plot, while the villains assist him by bloviating about how painful everyone’s death will be when eventually inflicted. Finally, in a novel where art forgery plays a starring role, the details of the forgery are too sketchy. We can’t help but wonder if Rankin is like his character here: having retired Rebus, he’s still looking for a new thrill to equal the old one. -- Graff, Keir (Reviewed 11-01-2009) (Booklist, vol 106, number 5, p4)
  • In Scottish author Rankin's intricately plotted heist thriller, software millionaire Mike Mackenzie, high-end banker Allan Cruikshank, and college art professor Robert Gissing devise a plan to “liberate” forgotten works of art from a warehouse storing the overflow from Edinburgh's museum collections. The trio commissions an art student nursing an antiestablishment grudge to paint fakes to swap for the originals, and Mackenzie's chance meeting with schoolmate Charlie “Chib” Calloway, now one of the city's most notorious gangsters, allows the group access to muscle and weapons. But cracks soon appear in the plan, with an inquisitive detective inspector, who's been on Calloway's trail for months, getting too close for comfort. Using the smalltown feel of Edinburgh to advantage, Rankin (Exit Music ) gives his caper novel a claustrophobic edge while injecting enough twists, turns, and triple crosses that even the most astute reader will be surprised at the outcome. (Jan.) --Staff (Reviewed November 30, 2009) (Publishers Weekly, vol 256, issue 48, p29)
  • Rankin's ( ) follow-up to his 17th and final Inspector Rebus novel, Exit Music (Audio Reviews, LJ 1/09)—also available from Hachette Audio and read by James Macpherson—is his first stand-alone thriller since the pseudonymously written Blood Hunt (1994). Here, retired software millionaire/art lover Mike Mackenzie enlists the aid of a banker, a distinguished art historian, an art student, and Edinburgh's leading gangster to rob the National Gallery of Scotland. Mix in a suspicious police inspector, the student's greedy girlfriend, and a particularly vicious Scandinavian thug, and the thieves find themselves in a spot of bother. Rankin offers a bit more humor here than in his beloved Inspector Rebus series; his skill at characterization remains top-notch. Macpherson varies his Scots burr depending on the given character's background, with some of the criminals having close to impenetrable accents. Fans of Rankin, heists, Edinburgh, and art history should find this entertaining.—Michael Adams, CUNY Graduate Ctr. Lib. --Michael Adams (Reviewed April 15, 2010) (Library Journal, vol 135, issue 7, p46)
  • With Detective Inspector John Rebus (Exit Music, 2008, etc.) rusticated by mandatory retirement, Rankin offers a stand-alone about dishonor among thieves.At 37, Mike Mackenzie has more money and time than he knows what to do with. The combination isn't certain to spell trouble, but that's the way to bet it. Having sold his partnership in a white-hot software company, Mike takes his place among Edinburgh's most bored eligible bachelors. By contrast, noted art expert Robert Gissing is far from bored; people with a mission seldom are. Prof. Gissing views himself as a freedom fighter on behalf of artworks. Too often, he insists, masterpieces are imprisoned, locked away from public appreciation in fat-cat boardrooms or neglected and half-forgotten in musty warehouses. He proposes that Mike join a liberation movement: "We'd be freeing them, not stealing them. We'd be doing it out of love." For Mike, it's a wake-up call and a siren song, and his heart races as he prepares to strike a blow. The team soon assembled includes a top-notch forger and a savvy bottom-feeder ready to supply whatever muscle is needed; clearly, not all team members are in it for the love of art. The heist is meticulously planned and carried out with impressive efficiency, but it's when the thieves fall out that the fun begins.Not up to Rankin's best—Rebus, we miss you—but certainly entertaining. (Kirkus Reviews, January 1, 2010)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
291327
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Rankin, Ian
Dewey number
823/.914
Index
no index present
LC call number
PR6068.A57
LC item number
D66 2010
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Art thefts
  • Suspense fiction
  • Edinburgh (Scotland)
Target audience
adult
Label
Doors open, Ian Rankin
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • "A Reagan Arthur book"--T.p
  • First published: London : Orion, 2008
Dimensions
25 cm.
Edition
1st U.S. ed.
Extent
364 p.
Isbn
9780316024785
Lccn
2009022283
System control number
  • (OCoLC)ocn319500784
  • (OCoLC)319500784
  • 146872
Label
Doors open, Ian Rankin
Publication
Note
  • "A Reagan Arthur book"--T.p
  • First published: London : Orion, 2008
Dimensions
25 cm.
Edition
1st U.S. ed.
Extent
364 p.
Isbn
9780316024785
Lccn
2009022283
System control number
  • (OCoLC)ocn319500784
  • (OCoLC)319500784
  • 146872

Library Locations

    • Cumming LibraryBorrow it
      585 Dahlonega Street, Cumming, GA, 30040, US
      34.220596 -84.131772
    • Sharon Forks LibraryBorrow it
      2820 Old Atlanta Road, Cumming, GA, 30041, US
      34.11878 -84.156553
    • Hampton Park LibraryBorrow it
      5345 Settingdown Road, Cumming, GA, 30041, US
      34.305256 -84.067603
Processing Feedback ...