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The Resource In Putin's footsteps : searching for the soul of an empire across Russia's eleven time zones, Nina Khrushcheva and Jeffrey Tayler

In Putin's footsteps : searching for the soul of an empire across Russia's eleven time zones, Nina Khrushcheva and Jeffrey Tayler

Label
In Putin's footsteps : searching for the soul of an empire across Russia's eleven time zones
Title
In Putin's footsteps
Title remainder
searching for the soul of an empire across Russia's eleven time zones
Statement of responsibility
Nina Khrushcheva and Jeffrey Tayler
Title variation
In Putins footsteps
Title variation remainder
searching for the soul of an empire across Russias eleven time zones
Creator
Contributor
Author
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
"In Putin's Footsteps is Nina Khrushcheva and Jeffrey Tayler's unique combination of travelogue, current affairs, and history, showing how Russia's dimensions have shaped its identity and culture through the decades. With exclusive insider status as Nikita Khrushchev's great grand-daughter, and an ex-pat living and reporting on Russia and the Soviet Union since 1983, Nina Khrushcheva and Jeffrey Tayler offer a poignant exploration of the largest country on earth through their recreation of Vladimir Putin's fabled New Year's Eve speech planned across all eleven time zones. After taking over from Yeltsin in 1999, and then being elected president in a landslide, Putin traveled to almost two dozen countries and a quarter of Russia's eighty-nine regions to connect with ordinary Russians. His travels inspired the idea of a rousing New Year's Eve address delivered every hour at midnight throughout Russia's eleven time zones. The idea was beautiful, but quickly abandoned as an impossible feat. He correctly intuited, however, that the success of his presidency would rest on how the country's outback citizens viewed their place on the world stage. Today more than ever, Putin is even more determined to present Russia as a formidable nation. We need to understand why Russia has for centuries been an adversary of the West. Its size, nuclear arsenal, arms industry, and scientific community (including cyber-experts), guarantees its influence"--
Storyline
Tone
Writing style
Review
  • Khrushcheva (The Lost Khrushchev), Russian-born professor of international affairs at the New School, and Tayler (Siberian Dawn), a Moscow-based American journalist married to a Russian, recount a cross-country journey they undertook in 2017 “to see and understand... Russia beyond the capital’s bounds.” They pose many fascinating questions—whether Putin’s plan to make Russia great again is reaching its hinterlands; how faith, myth, and geography shape national identity; whether the West can influence Russia’s future—that this charming travelogue with a dash of history can’t really answer. Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky, for example, on the Sea of Okhotsk in the Pacific, is rendered in terms of its eateries and grocery stores, and the chapter on Ulyanovsk details uncomfortable encounters with evasive museum guides and “grumpy” attendants. The result reads like a travel guide, with descriptions of historical monuments and anecdotal brushes with border guards, but little deeper substance. Readers accustomed to the Western press portraying Putin as a dictator might find it illuminating to learn that Russians say positive things about him—for example, that he has decreased unemployment, bolstered pensions, and revitalized the nation—which the authors receive with skepticism. Readers looking for a comprehensive understanding of the country will be disappointed, but the authors’ observations on Russian provincial culture are undoubtedly entertaining. Agent: Sonia Land, Sheil Land. (Feb.)
			 --Staff (Reviewed 11/12/2018) (Publishers Weekly, vol 265, issue 46, p)
  • Khrushcheva (international affairs, New Sch. Univ.;$SPACE$The Lost Khrushchev) along with author and expat Tayler (Siberian Dawn) journey across Russia, meeting locals from Moscow to Kamchatka and discussing the current state of the nation at every stop. More travelog than focused narrative, their search illuminates the mind-set of ordinary Russians and the post-Soviet experience. Their subjects are diverse, often in unfamiliar cities, and their landscape is cluttered with factories, monuments, pollution, and massive civic projects. Public infrastructure deteriorates, but the "punitive organs" are well funded. Things work, if with difficulty, and the people seem willing to express their opinions with guarded openness. The authors muse over the many cultural aspects borrowed from the West and the deep appetite for national strength and respect. In the end, they describe Russia as a diverse neo-Eastern Christian empire whose inhabitants continue to support Putin's imperial ambitions. VERDICT For students of the vast country, this is a verbose and complex narrative that will find a place in large subject collections --Edwin Burgess (Reviewed 02/01/2019) (Library Journal, vol 144, issue 1, p103)
  • Two experts on Russia team up to travel across that vast nation's 11 time zones, exploring key settlements in depth along the way. Khrushcheva (International Affairs/New School Univ.; The Lost Khrushchev: A Journey into the Gulag of the Russian Mind, 2014, etc.) is the great-granddaughter of Nikita Khrushchev as well as the author of previous books about her former homeland. Atlantic contributing editor Tayler (Murderers in Mausoleums: Riding the Back Roads of Empire Between Moscow and Beijing, 2009, etc.) is an American residing in Moscow and married to a Russian woman. Current Russian ruler Vladimir Putin is the primary connecting thread in the narrative. Throughout, the authors obsessively dissect the possible meanings of his policies and practices, as do the countless Russian citizens they encounter. The authors ably capture the vastness of the cobbled-together nation, the extremes encompassed within that vastness, and how the history of trying to tame the wildly divergent population spread out massive distances from Moscow is melding with current efforts to do the same. Hardly anybody who spoke with Tayler and Khrushcheva felt shame about their nation; rather, those conversing with the co-authors tended to mingle fierce pride with an inferiority complex about the current standing of the country in the world order. They looked toward the European heritage and away from the Asian heritage while proposing that no heritage from the outside could ever negate the uniqueness of the national character. At intervals, Khrushcheva is forced to confront that her great-grandfather, along with other significant figures like Mikhail Gorbachev and Boris Yeltsin, is being erased from the historical narrative, as Putin hogs the credit as heir to Lenin and Stalin. Much of the trip, she writes in her acknowledgments, was "an exercise in survival, perseverance, professional obligation, and constant inner dialogue...about life, Russia, power, people, the Gulag, and literature." A breathtaking and occasionally exhausting journey, with candid accounts reported from each stop along the route. (Kirkus Reviews, December 15, 2018)
Assigning source
Provided by publisher
Biography type
contains biographical information
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10755160
Cataloging source
LBSOR/DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1962-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Khrushcheva, Nina L.
Dewey number
947.086/2
Illustrations
  • illustrations
  • maps
  • plates
Index
index present
LC call number
DK510.76
LC item number
.K53 2019
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Tayler, Jeffrey
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Khrushcheva, Nina L
  • Tayler, Jeffrey
  • Putin, Vladimir Vladimirovich
  • Regionalism
  • Russia (Federation)
  • Russia (Federation)
  • Russia (Federation)
  • Russia (Federation)
Target audience
adult
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
searching for the soul of an empire across Russia's eleven time zones
Label
In Putin's footsteps : searching for the soul of an empire across Russia's eleven time zones, Nina Khrushcheva and Jeffrey Tayler
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Kaliningrad: the amber-tinted gaze of an empire -- Kiev: the mother of all Russian cities or the threat to mother Russia? -- Arkhangelsk, Solovetsky Islands, Saint Petersburg, and Moscow: Kremlin time, or Russia's clock of clocks -- Ulyanovsk (Simbirsk) and Samara (Kuibyshev): cities of the mighty Volga -- Perm, Yekaterinburg, and Tyumen: the Urals' holy trinity -- Omsk: a mixed metaphor of Putin's empire -- Novosibirsk: a story of science and serendipity -- Ulan-ude, Irkutsk, and Lake Baikal: Asian abodes of the spirit -- Blagoveshchensk-Heihe and Yakutsk: roughing it -- Vladivostok: rule the East! -- Magadan and Butugychag: from the Gulag capital to the Valley of Death -- Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky: the very far East -- Epilogue: the past of the Russian future
Dimensions
22 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
viii, 308 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates
Isbn
9781250163233
Lccn
2018039821
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other control number
40028910412
Other physical details
color illustrations, map
System control number
  • (OCoLC)1031543819
  • (OCoLC)on1031543819
  • 614938
Label
In Putin's footsteps : searching for the soul of an empire across Russia's eleven time zones, Nina Khrushcheva and Jeffrey Tayler
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Kaliningrad: the amber-tinted gaze of an empire -- Kiev: the mother of all Russian cities or the threat to mother Russia? -- Arkhangelsk, Solovetsky Islands, Saint Petersburg, and Moscow: Kremlin time, or Russia's clock of clocks -- Ulyanovsk (Simbirsk) and Samara (Kuibyshev): cities of the mighty Volga -- Perm, Yekaterinburg, and Tyumen: the Urals' holy trinity -- Omsk: a mixed metaphor of Putin's empire -- Novosibirsk: a story of science and serendipity -- Ulan-ude, Irkutsk, and Lake Baikal: Asian abodes of the spirit -- Blagoveshchensk-Heihe and Yakutsk: roughing it -- Vladivostok: rule the East! -- Magadan and Butugychag: from the Gulag capital to the Valley of Death -- Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky: the very far East -- Epilogue: the past of the Russian future
Dimensions
22 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
viii, 308 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates
Isbn
9781250163233
Lccn
2018039821
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other control number
40028910412
Other physical details
color illustrations, map
System control number
  • (OCoLC)1031543819
  • (OCoLC)on1031543819
  • 614938

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