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The Resource The baptism, Shelia P. Moses

The baptism, Shelia P. Moses

Label
The baptism
Title
The baptism
Statement of responsibility
Shelia P. Moses
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
In twentieth-century Occoneechee Neck, North Carolina--an area still affected by its history of slavery--twelve-year-old Leon Curry reflects about whether he wants to give up sinning to be baptized alongside his twin brother
Character
Review
  • Set in the same North Carolina rural community in the 1940s as Moses first novel, The Legend of Billy Bush (2004), a Coretta Scott King Honor Book, and its sequel, The Return of Buddy Bush (2006), this story is told by Buddy's 12-year-old cousin, Leon, who, with his twin, Luke, is preparing to be baptized. Slavery is gone, but racist oppression isn't: Papa was murdered by a white man, black people «still work for white folks and take their orders all day,» and black children continue to leave school to pick tobacco and cotton. But then there's Ma's caring white brother, who helps her. The family story, the heart of the novel, is honest about the raging anger, the jealousy, and also the love in the family, which is led by tough, caring Ma. But Leon isn't quite sure what family means. Sharp and immediate, the boy's narrative draws on Moses' own family story as it brings close the cruel secrets of slavery's legacy as well as the powerful ties of family during hard times. -- Hazel Rochman (Reviewed 02-01-2007) (Booklist, vol 103, number 11, p50)
  • Gr 4–6— Returning to Northampton County, NC, the setting for her Buddy Bush novels (S & S), Moses introduces 12-year-old African-American twins Leon and Luke. The time period is left undefined, but has a recent historical feel. Leon, the narrator, is free with his opinions on just about everything, including his brothers, his mother, his stepfather, and his upcoming baptism. He saves his worst scorn for "White Cousin," a bully and one of the many white people in the area who have unacknowledged blood ties to Leon's family and other black residents. Leon's mother believes that the twins need to show that they are ready to be saved before the baptism, but Leon can't seem to give up sinning even for a week. The baptism is the focal point of the story, but differs quite a lot from how most churched kids will have experienced it, giving the subject a somewhat limited appeal. Despite this, Leon is spirited and engaging. The minor characters are less fully developed, but the setting is evocative, with definite regional appeal. The ending includes a positive step toward reconciliation between races. Those who haven't read the previous novels won't have any trouble following this one. With its large font and trim length, it could also work for last-minute book reports.—Faith Brautigam, Gail Borden Public Library, Elgin, IL --Faith Brautigam (Reviewed March 1, 2007) (School Library Journal, vol 53, issue 3, p214)
  • /* Starred Review */ Moses (The Legend of Buddy Bush ) crafts a poignant and memorable voice in that of 12-year-old narrator Leon Curry, through his humorous observations about family, race and paternity in the tiny North Carolina community of Occoneechee Neck in Jackson. During the week leading up to his baptism, Leon feels ambivalent about whether he can or really wants to surrender lying and sinning for salvation—especially as his twin brother, Luke, is "Mr. Goody Two-Shoes most of the time," and, a year past being "saved," his big brother, whom the twins call Joe Nasty, remains "just as mean as a rattlesnake." Plus, Leon says, "I am going to miss sinning some kind of bad. Sinning is the main reason I get out of bed in the morning." But he tries for his Mama's sake, despite missing his dad ("a good man with bad luck," killed by "white trash" Mr. Pollard, who owed Leon's father 15 dollars). and resenting his lazy, dishonest stepfather ("Ma is so smart about everything but Filthy Frank," he says). He defines the immutable rule of the town as "you can't mess with these fine white folks and get away with it," and their white landlord won't acknowledge that he and Leon's mother share the same father. Readers will utterly believe Leon's precociousness and likely savor his gentle gaffes, such as describing his gossipy cousin as "nothing but an ease dropper." Ultimately, during this combustible week, various tensions bubbling below the surface of the Southern niceties erupt and, although Leon's family almost loses everything, the power of love and family ties proves truly transformational. Ages 12-up. (Jan.) --Staff (Reviewed February 5, 2007) (Publishers Weekly, vol 254, issue 6, p61)
  • This colloquial first-person novel is set in rural North Carolina in some unspecified time before the modern civil-rights era. In a vigorous, rambling voice, 12-year-old Leon, a mischievous, African-American boy, relates the dramatic events that take place the week before he and his more compliant twin brother are baptized. These vivid happenings include Leon's separation from Luke during a tornado and the theft of his mother's savings by his ne'er-do-well stepfather, Filthy Frank. Given the hefty length of some chapters, and stream-of-consciousness approach, the arrangement by the days of the week seems artificial. And the narrative is weighed down by a confusing explanation of characters and events from previous stories (the acclaimed books about Buddy Bush). Moses is forthright about the unsavory legacy of slavery: Leon's wealthy white grandfather owned his black grandmother, and the white man who murdered Leon's beloved father was never charged. This intimate portrait of family and community eventually hits its stride as Moses makes a distinctive contribution in her portrait of a southern black church from the inside out. Includes an enlightening author's note and acknowledgements. (Fiction. 11-14) (Kirkus Reviews, December 1, 2006)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
161596
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Moses, Shelia P
Dewey number
[Fic]
Index
no index present
LC call number
PZ7.M8475
LC item number
Bap 2007
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/minGradeLevel
  • 4
  • 6
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Twins
  • Baptism
  • Family life
  • African Americans
  • Slavery
  • North Carolina
Target audience
juvenile
Label
The baptism, Shelia P. Moses
Instantiates
Publication
Dimensions
22 cm.
Extent
130 p.
Isbn
9781416906711
Lccn
2005028408
Other control number
9781416906711
System control number
  • ocm62127723
  • (OCoLC)62127723
Label
The baptism, Shelia P. Moses
Publication
Dimensions
22 cm.
Extent
130 p.
Isbn
9781416906711
Lccn
2005028408
Other control number
9781416906711
System control number
  • ocm62127723
  • (OCoLC)62127723

Library Locations

    • Hampton Park LibraryBorrow it
      5345 Settingdown Road, Cumming, GA, 30041, US
      34.305256 -84.067603
    • Post Road LibraryBorrow it
      5010 Post Road, Cumming, GA, 30040, US
      34.205256 -84.220792
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